Mihi

Persian Clover

Trifolium resupinatum

Technical Data Sheet

Description

Mihi Persian Clover is highly palatable with high protein and moisture content that allows utilization as a high-quality forage and silage. Mihi Persian clover stimulates companion summer grasses, and it produces an abundance of volunteer seeds, allowing for natural reseeding. Uniquely different cell walls enable Mihi Persian Clover to be more digestible than red clover or alfalfa and extend the grazing season in southern pastures. Extended high carrying capacity is possible in the spring months, with better growth during winter/early spring months than white clovers on less fertile soils. The nutritional value of Mihi Persian Clover is better than cereal straws and can meet the requirements of adult buffalos. Find reduced feed costs in finishing pigs by supplementing up to 10% of a cereal-soybean meal without effects on weight gain.

Warmer locations prefer Mihi Persian Clover to Alfalfa because cuttings occur early enough to sow cereal crops. Able to improve pest and disease control, reduce fertilizer usage, and enhance other crop yields in rotation, Persian clover also has an allelopathic effect on germinating weeds. It will attract flower flies that reduce aphid outbreaks in vegetable crops. Rich in protein and minerals, Mihi Persian Clover contains relatively low levels of fiber and lignin.

Growth Pattern

Growth Pattern

Growth Pattern

Overwintering Mihi Persian Clover or spring sowing with wheat will ensure the crop is available for grazing or making hay after harvesting the cereal crops. Other possible choices for intercropping include barley and ryegrass. In infertile soils, Persian clover can be a great intercrop with rice.

Interseeding

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Overwintering Mihi Persian Clover or spring sowing with wheat will ensure the crop is available for grazing or making hay after harvesting the cereal crops. Other possible choices for intercropping include barley and ryegrass. In infertile soils, Persian clover can be a great intercrop with rice.

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Interseeding

Seeds/Lb: 260,000

Adaptation

Soil Conditions

Soil Conditions

Soil Conditions

Soil pH: 5.0 – 9.0

Growth

Growth

Growth

Optimum Growth Range: 20°F – 80°F

Establishment

Planting

Planting

Planting

Seed should be broadcast or drilled in autumn for usage during the spring. Sow with wheat after cereal crop harvest in the late spring for grazing or haying in colder climates. Warmer locations can fall sow, harvest in early spring, and follow with a cereal grain crop. Sow into dryland regions with a minimum of eighteen inches annually irrigation or precipitation as a winter forage crop in warmer areas or as a summer annual in more northern or high elevation areas.

Seeding Depth: ¼”

Monoculture: 6 – 8 Lb/A

Germination

Germination

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 7 – 14 days

Ideal Temp: 10°F – 82°F

Management

Grazing

Grazing

Grazing

Reduce stocking during flowering to ensure reseeding for the following year.

Earliest Time To Graze: ½” – 1″

Fertilizing

Fertilizing

Fertilizing

Phosphorus should be applied at rates of 10 – 25 lb/ac depending on soil tests and Potash levels.

At Planting: 15 lb/A N – 25 lb/A N

During Grazing Season: Not Applicable

Hay/Silage

Hay/Silage

Hay/Silage

When making hay, pair with annual ryegrass or cereal crops and sow into well-irrigated fields.

Timing: 6 – 9 weeks into the growing season

Cuttings During Season: 2 – 3

Recovery

Recovery

Recovery

Regrowth after grazing or cuttings is excellent.

Minimum Graze Height: 4″

Rest Period: 2 – 3 weeks

Mixes

Mixes

Mixes

Utilize Mihi Persian Clover in pure stands or mixtures with either a cereal crop or annual grass, including oats and annual ryegrass. Persian clover is a fantastic addition to barley-ryegrass mixes. It will reduce the need for mineral fertilizers, improve mid-season yield, and increase the forage’s in vitro digestibility.

  • Cereal Crops
  • Annual Grasses
  • Oats
  • Barley

Yield

Yield

Yield

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 4 – 6

Considerations

Mihi Persian Clover is not suited to permanent pasture usage; however, seeding with other self-reseeding legumes will create a long-lasting pasture. Herbage mass will decline over time, and Mihi Persian Clover will mature and will reseed itself if allowed. Grazing should occur early, or grasses in the sward may have growth stunted.

Competition

Competition

Competition

Use caution that cereal grains do not shade out the Persian clover and reduce yield. Thin weed populations before planting as Mihi Persian Clover is not very competitive. Once firmly anchored, use heavy stocking for weed control.

Risks

Risks

Risks

Due to the protein richness of Mihi Persian Clover, ruminant grazing may result in increased ammonia production and increased N excretion in soils. While there are bloat cases in cattle grazing Persian clover, there have been no reported cases with sheep. Address bloat concerns by planting Persian clover with grasses, feeding cattle with dry hay before entering the sward, turning cattle out of the stand after midday, or using anti-foaming agents poloxalene or molasses/urea blocks. Persian clover contains saponins and phenolic compounds that, in low levels, usually are not a problem, but mixing Persian clover with other feeds is recommended. Adverse effects can occur on pure swards, including photosensitization when grazing sheep. Utilize maize silage to improve nutrient balances.

Diseases

Diseases

Diseases

  • Diseases
  • Alfalfa Mosaic
  • Red Clover Mosaic
  • Aphanomyces Root Rot
  • Clover Rot
  • Common Leaf Spot
  • Root Rot

Pests

Pests

Pests

  • Alfalfa Weevil

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

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